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Presenting Domains of Freedom: 20 years after apartheid, are we perpetuating a lie?

Domains of FreedomUCT Press presents Domains of Freedom: Justice, Citizenship and Social Change in South Africa edited by Thembela Kepe, Bettina von Lieres and Melissa Levin:

After 20 years of freedom in South Africa we have to ask ourselves difficult questions: are we willing to perpetuate a lie, search for facts or think wishfully? Freedom has been enabled by apartheid’s end, but at the same time some of apartheid’s key institutions and social relations are reproduced under the guise of “democracy”.

This collection acknowledges the enormous expectations placed on the shoulders of the South African revolution to produce an alternative political regime in response to apartheid and global neo-liberalism. It does not lament the inability of South Africa’s democracy to provide deeper freedoms, or suggest that since it hasn’t this is some form of betrayal. Freedom is made possible and/or limited by local political choices, contemporary global conditions and the complexities of social change. This book explores the multiplicity of spaces within which the dynamics of social change unfold, and the complex ways in which power is produced and reproduced. In this way, it seeks to understand the often non-linear practices through which alternative possibilities emerge, the lengthy and often indirect ways in which new communities are imagined and new solidarities are built. In this sense, this book is not a collection of hope or despair. Nor is it a book that seeks to situate itself between these two poles. Instead it aims to read the present historically, critically and politically, and to offer insights into the ongoing, iterative and often messy struggles for freedom.

About the editors

Thembela Kepe is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography, and the Centre for Critical Development Studies at the University of Toronto, Canada. He is also a Visiting Professor in the Geography Department, Rhodes University, South Africa.

Melissa Levin is a PhD student in Political Science and an instructor in African Studies at the University of Toronto. She has taught the politics of regional integration at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University and African Literature at Khanya College. She was a trade union educator for the National Union of Mineworkers and a research and strategy director at the ANC where she edited Umrabulo for a number of years.

Bettina von Lieres is a Lecturer in the Centre for Critical Development Studies at the University of Toronto, and she is Extraordinary Senior Researcher in the Political Studies Department at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa.

Book details

  • Domains of Freedom: Justice, Citizenship and Social Change in South Africa edited by Thembela Kepe, Bettina von Lieres and Melissa Levin
    EAN: 9781775822042
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Fascinating conversation about the life of Emily Hobhouse at the launch of Robert Eales’s The Compassionate Englishwoman

Robert Eales

The Kalk Bay Books launch of The Compassionate Englishwoman: Emily Hobhouse in the Boer War by Robert Eales was a well-attended event, with local history buffs enjoying listening to and engaging with the author.

Eales is South African, and visited from Australia to launch this inspiring and comprehensive account on a country-wide tour.

On his retirement in 2005 from a career in business, Eales pursued his passion for research, writing about the Anglo-Boer War. He focused on the Free State, surrounding the city of Bloemfontein, where he went to school and from where his own ancestors hailed. Eales’s presentation to the Australian Boer War Study Group’s 20th Anniversary Conference in Melbourne in 2013 led to the publication of this book.

Robert Eales and Elizabeth van HeyningenThe Compassionate EnglishwomanEales was joined by the historian Elizabeth van Heyningen, with whom he had been in correspondence for many years. Her research and book The Concentration Camps of the Anglo-Boer War had richly informed Eales’s own, though he asserted his was a popular writing of the narrative and not an academic one.

Eales and Van Heyningen met for the first time, face to face, and enjoyed a fascinating conversation about the life of Emily Hobhouse. Van Heyningen reflected on the humanitarian and political role Hobhouse had played. She asked Eales what personal dynamics had driven Hobhouse to get involved in consciousness raising and protest against Roberts, Kitchener, Brodrick and Milner.

At the age of 39, Hobhouse’s father had passed away and she was free to reinvent herself. She had lived a sheltered life as the daughter of an Anglican priest but, without hesitation, she took up the cause of the Boer women and children who were suffering atrocious conditions in the camps.

Van Heyningen praised the accessible and readable text of the The Compassionate Englishwoman, expressing the hope that this powerful narrative will be rediscovered. For Eales, the significance of telling this story beyond the borders of South Africa remains utterly relevant when the global humanitarian crisis of refugees faces us. “It behoves us as a species to hold powerful individuals accountable for human suffering,” he said.

Liesl Jobson (@LieslJobson) tweeted live from the event:


 

 
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Seven UCT Press titles longlisted for inaugural ASSAF Humanities Book Award

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Sufi Narratives of IntimacyFrom Man to Man, or Perhaps OnlyGrowing the Next Generation of ResearchersHostels, Homes, MuseumMyth and MeaningThe Victoria Mxenge Housing ProjectCommunity of Insecurity

 
Seven UCT Press titles have been longlisted for the inaugural Academy of Science in South Africa (ASSAF) Humanities Book Award.

The longlist was announced by the ASSAF Humanities Standing Committee.

The award seeks to identify writers of scholarly, well-written works of non-fiction, published up to three years (2013, 2014 and 2015) prior to their nomination.

The winning book should be noteworthy in its contribution to developing new understanding and insight of a topic in the humanities, and will be awarded R30,000.

Winners will be announced in September. Congratulations to the longlisted authors!

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Don’t miss the launch of The Compassionate Englishwoman by Robert Eales at UFS

The Compassionate Englishwoman: Emily Hobhouse in the Boer WarUCT Press and Protea Bookshop invite you to the launch of The Compassionate Englishwoman: Emily Hobhouse in the Boer War by Robert Eales.

The event will take place on Tuesday, 24 May at the Archive for Contemporary Affairs Reading Room at the University of the Free State.

Don’t miss it!
 
 

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Don’t miss the launch of The Compassionate Englishwoman by Robert Eales at Grey College

The Compassionate Englishwoman: Emily Hobhouse in the Boer WarUCT Press and Grey College invite you to the launch of The Compassionate Englishwoman: Emily Hobhouse in the Boer War by Robert Eales.

The event will take place on Tuesday, 24 May at 10 AM.

Don’t miss it!
 
 
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Rape Unresolved: Policing sexual offences in South Africa by Dee Smythe launched at UCT

Dee Smythe

 

New UCT Press publication Rape Unresolved: Policing sexual offences in South Africa by Dee Smythe was launched recently at the Kramer Law Building at the University of Cape Town.

Dee SmytheRape UnresolvedDebates around South Africa’s rape culture and violence against women are building momentum. This year alone has seen anti-rape protests at Rhodes University, the #NakedProtest and #RUReferenceList marches, which saw all campus activity suspended, and a rape awareness initiative that spread to Stellenbosch University and the University of Cape Town, where a Sexual Offence Response Team has been established.

But rape takes place off-campus, too. More than 1,000 women are raped in South Africa every day. Around 150 of those women will report the crime to the police. Fewer than 30 of the cases will be prosecuted and no more than 10 will result in a conviction – that’s 4 percent.

In Rape Unresolved: Policing sexual offences in South Africa, Smythe, who is Director of the Centre for Law and Society at UCT, is concerned with the question of police discretion and how it shapes the criminal justice response to rape in South Africa.

Through a detailed, qualitative review of rape dockets and victim statements, as well as interviews with detectives, prosecutors, magistrates and rape counsellors, the author provides key insights into police responses to rape.

Smythe was in conversation with Dr Kelley Moult about the book.

Facebook album:

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Don’t miss the launch of The Reb and the Rebel at the South African Jewish Museum

Invitation to the launch of The Reb and the Rebel: Jewish Narratives in South Africa 1892-1913, edited by Carmel Schrire and Gwynne Schrire

 
The Reb and the Rebel: Jewish Narratives in South Africa 1892-1913UCT Press, the Kaplan Centre, the South African Jewish Museum and the Gitlin Library invite you to the launch of The Reb and the Rebel: Jewish Narratives in South Africa 1892-1913, edited by Carmel Schrire and Gwynne Schrire.

The Reb and the Rebel contains three previously unpublished autobiographical works mainly covering the period 1892-1913: a diary, a poem and a memoir. The first two were written by Yehuda Leib Schrire (1851-1912), and are set in a number of countries including Lithuania, Holland, England and South Africa. The third is by his son, Harry Nathan (1895-1980).

Few of the early immigrants to South Africa were writers, let alone poets, and the social history provided in these documents embellishes and enlivens the picture of South African Jewish communities at the turn of the 20th century.

The launch will take place at the South African Jewish Museum on Wednesday, 25 May.

See you there!

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Don’t miss the launch of Rape Unresolved: Policing sexual offences in South Africa by Dee Smythe at UCT

Rape Unresolved: Policing sexual offences in South AfricaUCT Press invites you to the launch of Rape Unresolved: Policing sexual offences in South Africa by Dee Smythe.

More than 1 000 women are raped in South Africa every day. Around 150 of those women will report the crime to the police. Fewer than 30 of the cases will be prosecuted and no more than 10 will result in a conviction. This translates into an overall conviction rate of 4-8 percent of reported cases. So what happens to all the other cases?

Rape Unresolved is concerned with the question of police discretion and how its exercise shapes the criminal justice response to rape in South Africa.

The launch will take place on Thursday, 12 May at the Faculty Common Room on the 4th floor of Kramer Law Building at the University of Cape Town.

Not to be missed.

Event Details

  • Date: Thursday, 12 May 2016
  • Time: 5:00 PM to 6:00 PM
  • Venue: Faculty Common Room
    4th Floor Kramer Law Building
    UCT | Map
  • RSVP: abigail.calata@uct.ac.za

 
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Clarke’s Bookshop to host the launch of The Compassionate Englishwoman: Emily Hobhouse in the Boer War

The Compassionate Englishwoman: Emily Hobhouse in the Boer WarClarke’s Bookshop and UCT Press invite you to the launch of The Compassionate Englishwoman: Emily Hobhouse in the Boer War by Robert Eales.

The launch will take place on Thursday, 12 May at 5:30 PM at Clarke’s Bookshop on Long Street in Cape Town.

See you there!

The Compassionate Englishwoman is an arresting work of historical scholarship that combines a shocking argument concerning British atrocities in the Boer War and a mesmerising account of Emily Hobhouse’s determination to end the cruelty and deaths associated with the notorious British concentration camps.

- Marilyn Lake, Professor in History at the University of Melbourne and Past-President of the Australian Historical Association

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How to read Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita

RelocationsAs part of the Great Texts/Big Questions public lecture series in 2010, Imraan Coovadia gave a talk titled “How to read Lolita”.

The Gordon Institute for the Performing and Creative Arts lecture series gave audiences a chance to engage with transformative texts and questions and to hear thought leaders speak on the ideas, the books, the art, and the films that matter to them and to us.

The talks have now been collected into a book: Relocations: Reading Culture in South Africa, edited by Cóilín Parsons, Coovadia and Alexandra Dodd.

Coovadia is an academic, essayist and the author of the novels The Wedding, Green-Eyed Thieves, High Low In-between, The Institute For Taxi Poetry and Tales Of The Metric System.

Watch a video recording of his talk:

GT/BQ 2010 – Imraan Coovadia – Lolita – 1 April 2010 from GIPCA@UCT on Vimeo.

Listen to the audio:

About the lecture:

Written by Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita was first published in Paris in 1955. It is one of the best-known and most controversial books of 20th Century literature. Coovadia says: “I’ll be talking about the Lolita problem. How do we respond to a book which is a first person narrative by a man who is trying to seduce a 12 year old girl after marrying her mother? Nabokov promises us readers “bliss”? Well, what sort of bliss? Is there a “lesson” in reading Lolita and why has Nabokov described it as the most moral of his novels?”

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